we just found the most distant and oldest solar system to date

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On March 23, NASA promised an “exciting discovery” worthy of entering “the record book”. He didn’t elaborate, but he did promise that “Hubble’s discovery would not only further our understanding of the universe, it would create an exciting area of ​​research for the future of Hubble and the newly launched James Webb Telescope.” Well, we already have it here.


At 12.9 billion light years… ‘Earendel’ is an Old English word meaning “morning star” or “rising light” and is precisely the name that the team at Brian Welch has chosen to name the most distant star we have ever been able to detect. The name is not even painted because, indeed, it is all a nascent light: a planetary system that emerged only 900 million years after the Big Bang.

a gravitational lens. Gravitational or gravitational, this type of “lensing” forms when light from distant, bright objects bends around a massive object (most typically a galaxy, hence the name a galaxy) located between the emitting object and the receiver (and is amplified). In this way, by scrutinizing the sky well, we can see distant things that are behind relatively closer objects.

We have found another planet "potentially habitable" very close.  It's less exciting than it seems

Well, using this phenomenon and thanks to Hubble, researchers have identified a star (single or double star system) with an estimated mass of about 50 times that of the sun. The discovery is exceptional because the “red shift” is 6.2. The “red shift” is the effect that allows us to infer the distance of astronomical objects. The higher the number, the farther. Previous observations of more distant individual stars have had shifts of 1.5 at most.

At the edge of the known universe. It is true that the precise details of the temperature, mass and spectral properties of the star remain unknown, but the discovery materializes something that until now we can only intuit. Now the ball is over the court of the James Webb: the $10 billion telescope has in its hand to forever change the way we understand planetary science.

Image | POT

On March 23, NASA promised an “exciting discovery” worthy of entering “the record book”. He didn’t elaborate, but he did…

On March 23, NASA promised an “exciting discovery” worthy of entering “the record book”. He didn’t elaborate, but he did…

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