Time to limit the speed of cars to 200 km/h: the DGT is already flirting with a future regulation

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Time to limit the speed of cars to 200 km/h: the DGT is already flirting with a future regulation

If there is someone who leaves controversial headlines in Spain related to the motor world, that is Pere Navarro. The director of the DGT has always opted for reduce speed on highwaysuch as limiting all secondary roads to 90 km/h or all one lane streets in each direction at 30 km/h. And in his last interview he has also left forceful headlines.


“Going faster than 200 km/h in Spain is a crime, so buying a car that goes at that speed can only take you to jail, but they are for sale.” The phrase has been recorded in Intermitentes.tva space of the Abertis Foundation where Pere Navarro has been interviewed.

It is not the only controversial phrase that the director of the DGT has left during the interview. In it he also points out that those vehicles that reach these speeds should not be sold in Europe, where “everything is limited”. And it warns of a future where the limits allowed with this margin cannot be exceeded. “The car has all the cartography, therefore it knows the speed of each section, it has the reader that can read the road signs with which this is processed. Ok, I’ll leave you a margin but period, we’ve come this far. You’re not going to be able to go further”.

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Where do we put the limit?

Although controversial, Navarro’s statements support an irrefutable statement: going at 200 km/h is more dangerous and unsafe than going at 120 km/h. It is also evident that consequences of a high-speed crash they are much more serious but, where do we put the limit? In the same interview, Navarro points to Volvo as the way forward.

The Swedish company announced that it would limit all its cars to 180 km/h. Volvo has always stood out for implementing pioneering safety measures but it doesn’t seem that limiting a car to 180 km/h or 200 km/h is going to change things much. Navarro also generalizes with his idea ban vehicles exceeding the maximum permitted speed by a wide margin. What happens to someone who buys a sports car, complies with traffic regulations and wants to get the most out of it on a circuit? And who travels to Germany and wants to travel above 120 km/h on an Autobahn?

And doubts assail us with another affirmation. If the car leaves a margin to exceed the maximum speed allowed, where do we put that limit? Because going at 140 km/h will always be more dangerous than going at 120 km/h. And even more dangerous to go at 160 km/h. Taking into account that the DGT itself eliminated the margin of 20 km/h to overtake on secondary roads, why allow a car to overcome the limitation of the road?

opening speed

And yet the time may have come

Until now, Pere Navarro’s statements have always been in line with protecting security. It is one of the reasons why the European Union has given the go-ahead to incorporate the intelligent speed assistant as a mandatory standard in all cars, as part of its vision zero project which includes a good package of ADAS driving aids.

But, beyond Volvo, whoever has positioned or implemented speed limits has done so for very different reasons. In Germany, there has been a debate for some time about whether the time has come to put limits on the Autobahnthose motorways with sections in which there is no maximum authorized speed, and which are hot again after The owner of a Bugatti Chiron will record himself driving at 417 km / h.

The average European car is already twelve years old.  And it's a problem to reach emissions and safety targets

in Xataka

The average European car is already twelve years old. And it’s a problem to reach emissions and safety targets

Those who adduce reasons to defend a limitation in these sections point out the environmental Protection as one of his great reasons. According to the German Federal Climate Agency, limit speed on the autobahn would save the emission of two million tons of CO2 per year.

A figure that the defenders of the freeway do not consider important enough and which they attack pointing out that, in the first place, it is almost impossible to calculate, since the weight of the car and the speed at which it travels must be taken into account. Also, to get an idea, in 2020 Germany recorded emissions of 65,325 megatons of CO2. That is, the savings would be 0.003% of the total.

And although there are those who reject Navarro’s statements or describe the German measures as paternalistic, the truth is that each time more manufacturers are limiting their vehicles, although they do not campaign for it, like Volvo. One of the main reasons: the arrival of the electric car.

Renault Megane E Tech 2022 1600 15

Intended to protect components or prevent a driver “founds” autonomy of their batteries, there are not a few manufacturers that limit the maximum speed of their electric models. Renault has already announced that its next models will also be limited to a maximum of 180 km/h to improve security. The Renault M√©gane E-Tech, its electric version, is already limited to 160 km/h.

Skoda does the same with the Enyaq. The SUV has versions limited to 160 km/h and the RS, the sportiest, reaches 180 km/h. And things get complicated with smaller models. A Peugeot e-208 is limited to 150 km/h. The most powerful Volkswagen ID.3 sold in Spain is limited to 160 km/h and the more modest Renault ZOE remains at 135 km/h. And these are just a few examples.

Either safety reasons, ecology or self-protection in new models, security limitations are here to stay.


The news

Time to limit the speed of cars to 200 km/h: the DGT is already flirting with a future regulation

was originally published in

Xataka

by Alberto de la Torre.

If there is someone who leaves controversial headlines in Spain related to the motor world, that is Pere Navarro. The…

If there is someone who leaves controversial headlines in Spain related to the motor world, that is Pere Navarro. The…

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