These wind turbines have no blades and do not move. Your goal: conquer the rooftops

  • 19

At first glance they may look like chimneys, the outlet of a smoke extractor or even, stretching the imagination, an antenna, but of course not what they really are: windmills. That, yes, some very peculiar, devoid of blades, immobile and partly inspired by racing cars.

The firm Aeromine Technologies has just presented a peculiar wind turbine model with which —ensures— can be generated “up to 50% more of energy than other sustainable options at the same or lower cost”. Its system is designed to be installed on the edge of roofs, where a network of between 20 and 40 wind capture units is deployed, wind turbines very different from the large turbines with blades that we usually see in wind farms.

Its objective is to take advantage of gusts, which is why wind turbines are installed precisely on the edge of buildings and facing the direction in which the wind usually prevails.

Another way to take advantage of the wind

“Aeromine’s streamlined design captures and amplifies airflow of the building with wind speeds as low as 5 mph [unos 8 km/h]similar to the aerodynamic surfaces of a racing car”, explains the company, which ensures that the system is designed for buildings with large flat roofs, such as warehouses, logistics centers, factories or office blocks.

Its creators insist that Aeromine wind turbines lack blades, which allows them to avoid some of the weak points of classic turbines, such as their visual impact, the noise they generate or the risk of harming birds: “It is immobile. Take advantage of aerodynamics.”

The company also points out that they are capable of generating energy 24 hours a day, they adapt to any climate and their size allows you to take advantage of the space available on the roofs. What’s more, Aeromine calculates that it requires only 10% of the space that solar panels occupy.

“Designed to work seamlessly with a building’s existing electrical system, the combination of Aeromine’s wind solution with rooftop solar power can generate up to one hundred percent of the on-site energy needs of a building, while minimizing the need for energy storage”, say the company’s managers.

On its website it ensures that a single of its units can provide the same energy as 16 solar panels, although they do not specify any data on the tests, including the powers.

The technology used by Aeromine was “validated” in joint research with Sandia National Laboratories Y Texas Tech University and it is already being tested in companies, including the German chemical BASF Corporationwhich has applied it at its Wyandotte plant.

Cover image: Aeromine Technologies

At first glance they may look like chimneys, the outlet of a smoke extractor or even, stretching the imagination, an…

At first glance they may look like chimneys, the outlet of a smoke extractor or even, stretching the imagination, an…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.