the winners of the World Press Photo 2022

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The World Press Photo has granted the photography award of the Year to Amber Bracken, who reported for The New York Times. An image far from the epic of photojournalism and close to the feelings of humanity. We enter a new dynamic of the famous awards, which for once wants to get away from the controversies and focus on what is important, which is telling stories from a journalistic point of view.


In recent years, world press photo awards they have been more commented by the controversies that by the subject that treated the photographs. The digital edition, with the idea of ​​deceiving, has done a lot of damage to a profession that is increasingly wounded and forgotten by the media. And one of the bulwarks, these awards, failed to overcome the prestige of a profession damaged by economic and political interests.

This year’s WPP main prize goes to amber bracken. A photographer who did a report for ‘The New York Times’ on indigenous residential schools in Canada that began operating in the 19th century as part of a policy to assimilate indigenous ethnic groups into Western culture. It is estimated that 4,100 students died in them.

Title: Kamloops Residential School © Amber Bracken, for The New York Times

Kamloops Residential School © Amber Bracken, for The New York Times

It is not a hard image. It is an emotional photograph, in which the storm sun illuminates the crosses that have been placed in the Kamloops school. In the background the receding clouds and the rainbow. And it’s a good reflection of investigative photojournalism. It will not reach the covers, but it is capable of telling many things.

The World Press Photo Awards 2022

This year everything has changed. 64,823 photographs and open-format works have been submitted, submitted by 4,066 photographers from 130 countries. The high rate of participation continues to be one of its hallmarks.

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But everything else has changed. To have more diversity, they have divided the world into six regions. In addition, the thematic categories are forgotten and they focus on the work format:

  • Individual Photographs: World Press Photo of the Year nominees.
  • Photographic Reports: a story composed of 3-10 photographs.
  • Long Term Projects: portray the same subject for at least 3 years, with between 24 and 30 photographs
  • Open Format: New category that encompasses different types of storytelling, such as multi-exposure images, photo collages, interactive documentaries, and short documentary videos.

First, the prizes are given region by region. And among them are the global winners that have been announced these days. With this change they want to find different points of view in a fairer and more global way.

At the end 24 authors from 23 countries have been awarded: Argentina, Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Ecuador, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, India, Indonesia, Japan, Madagascar, Mexico, Nigeria, Netherlands, Norway, Palestine, Russia, Sudan, and Thailand. Spanish photographers have not been graced this year.

Photographic Report of the Year: ‘Saving Forests with Fire’ Matthew Abbott, Australia, for National Geographic/Panos Pictures

Indigenous Australians agreed to be portrayed by Matthew Abbott to show the world how the ‘cold burn’ is done. Since time immemorial they control their land with controlled fires to avoid major catastrophes. If the modern world had not forgotten these techniques, the great fires in the southern continent could have been avoided.

World Press Photo Story of the Year_Matthew Abbott_for National Geographic/Panos Pictures

World Press Photo Story of the Year_Matthew Abbott_for National Geographic/Panos Pictures

Long-Term Project Award: ‘Amazon Dystopia’ Lalo de Almeida, Brazil, for Folha de São Paulo/Panos Pictures

World Press Photo 2022

Lalo de Almeida, for Folha de São Paulo_Panos Pictures

The environmental policies of Jair Bolsonaro, the Brazilian president, have caused the highest rate of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest. This affects the biodiversity of the Amazon, but we can never forget the social impact it has on the indigenous communities, more than 350, who see their world disappear.

Title: Amazonian Dystopia © Lalo de Almeida, for Folha de São Paulo/Panos Pictures

Title: Amazonian Dystopia © Lalo de Almeida, for Folha de São Paulo/Panos Pictures

Lalo de Almeida He has been documenting the impact of such environmental policies on the lungs of the earth for years. And his work has been recognized by the WPP jury.

World Press Photo 2022

Lalo de Almeida_for Folha de São Paulo_Panos Pictures

Open format award: ‘Blood is a seed’ Isadora Romero, Ecuador

The work of Isadora Romero brings together photography, painting, and video to tell us about the loss of memory and how forced migration, wars, and colonization have caused the disappearance of the seeds that were grown in the Colombian town of his family.

The manipulated photographs have been criticized by many media outlets that did not understand the concept of this new award, open to new forms of expression within photojournalism, closer to artistic expression than to classical and pure information.

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Now all that remains is to wait for the opening of the exhibition that will tour the entire world, for the winners to receive their well-deserved cash prize. And that for the first time in a long time the controversies outside photojournalism stop drowning out a contest that always reminds us of what the humanity of which we are a part is like.

More information| World Press Photo 2022

The World Press Photo has granted the photography award of the Year to Amber Bracken, who reported for The New…

The World Press Photo has granted the photography award of the Year to Amber Bracken, who reported for The New…

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