The facade of this building will have 1,800 solar panels and will produce enough energy to be self-sufficient

  • 24

We are witnessing live the ‘boom’ of photovoltaic solar energy. With its advantages and disadvantages, there are more and more projects that have as their axis the production of electricity from the sun. From small self-consumption facilities to huge parks. The Australian firm Kennon is willing to exploit the possibilities of solar energy from an interesting perspective, according to New Atlas.

If you wanted to supply an eight-story office building with solar energy obtained through its own photovoltaic panels, it would not be enough to locate them on the roof and you would need a huge adjacent area. The company instead thought an alternative solution could be applied. Convert the building into a “huge solar panel” capable of of generating more electricity than it needs to function.

550 Spencer, the building with a thousand solar panels

The idea, at first, seemed interesting, but this company really wanted it to be more than just an idea or a render. So he set to work seriously on the project, and as he progressed, the challenges began to appear. The first was the design. It was not about putting solar panels on the facade of a building, but rather an elegant and harmonious design. To achieve this, they partnered with the German company Avancis and got down to work.

550 spencer

550 spencer

550 spencer 2

In conjunction with a local glass dealer, Kennon and Avancis devised a glass modules with integrated photovoltaic cells that will allow, as we see in the images, to have a more refined appearance than that of the classic panels that are seen on the roofs of houses. The concept was presented to the client who was going to invest in the building and it seemed fine, but the next challenge was not long in coming. That technology was not certified in Australia.

Without proper certification, the project simply could not move forward. So, the firm set out to overcome this problem and get the go-ahead from the authorities. He first built a replica of the building’s façade and, with the help of a construction safety expert, set it on fire to prove that it met the required requirements. Fortunately the move went well.

With approval in hand, Kennon broke ground on 550 Spencer in Melbourne in August this year with completion in mid-2023. 1,182 panels are expected to generate 142 kWp (maximum power under favorable conditions). According to Kennon, this will be enough to produce more electricity than the building requires, and will also free up rooftop and garden space for workers to enjoy after working in the office.

Spending zero electricity and having everything on: this is how I set up my own solar installation (with advice and recommendations)

As the project progresses we may know more details. There are some questions left on the table. For example, if the building will have an energy storage system to meet demand when solar radiation is not sufficient or if it will also be connected to the electricity grid so that everything continues to work at those times. With time we will know, for now there are no doubts that it is an interesting project.

In Xataka | The dream of achieving windows capable of generating solar energy, a little closer: we already have almost invisible photovoltaic cells

We are witnessing live the ‘boom’ of photovoltaic solar energy. With its advantages and disadvantages, there are more and more…

We are witnessing live the ‘boom’ of photovoltaic solar energy. With its advantages and disadvantages, there are more and more…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.