Some scientists don’t believe in quantum computing in the slightest. These are the reasons for two of them

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This is not the first time we have talked about Gil Kalai, a renowned Israeli mathematician who teaches at Yale University (United States). And the reason why we’ve mentioned him in several of the articles dedicated to quantum computing that we’ve published is that he is one of the respected scientists who have openly shown your lack of confidence on the promises of this discipline.

According to this researcher, the increase in the number of states of quantum systems and their complexity will cause end up behaving like classic computers, so the superiority of the former will end up evaporating. As expected, some authoritative voices have been raised with the purpose of showing their disagreement with Gil Kalai’s opinion, and one of them belongs, neither more nor less, to Ignacio Cirac, who is one of the founding fathers of quantum computing. .

The scientific community does not express itself unanimously, and it is positive that it is so

During the conversation I had with him in June 2021, Ignacio Cirac did not hesitate in the least when accepting the titanic challenges that this discipline has ahead of him, but, even so, disagreed specifically with Kalai: «Developing a quantum computer that does not have errors is very complicated. I have no doubt that it will happen (in this area I do not agree with what Gil says), but I think it will take a long time.

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In any case, Gil Kalai is not the only scientist who has openly expressed misgivings about the potential capabilities that other researchers attribute to quantum computing. Nikita Gourianov, a physicist specializing in quantum theory and engineering at the University of Oxford, also has shown his doubts in a forceful way: by ensuring that quantum computing is currently it’s just a financial bubble who still has to prove everything.

“Lots of expectations and little substance”

Gourianov does not mince words when given the opportunity to explain why a quantum computing researcher takes such a dim view of the state of development of the discipline in which he works. This is his strongest argument: the industry involved in the development of quantum computers has not yet developed a single product that is capable of solve a real practical problem. This statement admits nuances, but, in any case, this is what this physicist affirms.

According to Gourianov, the quantum computer industry has not yet developed a single product that is capable of solving a real practical problem.

Your statements to Financial Times are eloquent: “The small income it is generating [la computación cuántica] they often come from consulting and training services to other companies seeking to show them what quantum computers can do for their business, rather than from the genuine taking advantage that quantum computers have over classical supercomputers.

For Gourianov, this situation has caused the formation around quantum computing of a bubble that could be punctured if finally the quantum hardware does not manage to stop being as sensitive to errors as it is now. Interestingly, the perspective of this researcher is much more conservative than that of some companies. The road map What we can see below these lines puts IBM’s forecasts on the table, and they are ambitious. In fact, this company plans to have 2,026 quantum computers with more than 10,000 qubits ready. There it is.

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Cover image: IBM

Via: Financial Times

This is not the first time we have talked about Gil Kalai, a renowned Israeli mathematician who teaches at Yale…

This is not the first time we have talked about Gil Kalai, a renowned Israeli mathematician who teaches at Yale…

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