NASA has already set a date for the imminent launch

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The NASA Just confirmed that the Artemis I mission has passed its Flight Readiness Review. The FRR is the flight readiness review that all missions must pass. With this step, everything is ready: for this reason, the North American Agency has confirmed that, if the weather allows it and there is no unforeseen event, on August 29 at 2:33 p.m. we will take the first step of the return of the human being to the Moon.


What exactly is Artemis I? The Artemis program is one of the great scientific projects of the moment: not only does it seek to set foot on the Moon again (to take “the first woman and the next man” there), but it also wants to establish a sustainable presence on the surface and in lunar orbit ; and, incidentally, lay the foundations for a lunar economy. Within this ambitious program, Artemis I constitutes the first big step.

We are talking about an unmanned flight, yes; one that has been delayed on successive occasions, true. But above all, it is the great acid test for the Space Launch System (SLS) megarocket and the Orion capsule: two central elements of the program. If all goes well, Orion will orbit the Moon before returning to Earth and splashing down somewhere in the Pacific.

Which are the next steps? So that on August 29, 2022 at 2:33 p.m. (peninsular time) the SLS undertakes the journey, the mission must now pass the Launch Readiness Review. If in the FRR, like explains Wicho in Microservants, each of the areas “involved expose the state of things that fall under their responsibility and have to convince the rest that everything is ready for launch”; in the LRR, “it is taken into account that there have been no changes since the FRR and that the weather forecast is good” in order to finally approve the mission. This will take place 48 hours before launch; that is, on Saturday.

To the Moon and beyond. If all goes well and the mission as a whole is a success, the next step will be to bring humans into the equation. We won’t go to the surface of the Moon yet (we’re saving that for Artemis III), but we do have to “recreate” the Apollo 8 mission: a crew will orbit the satellite and return to Earth without landing on the surface. It will be called Artemis II and, in principle, its launch is scheduled for 2024. What happens in the next few days will define the next steps and reorganize the calendar.

We already know where we are going to land on the Moon (finally)

Follow the launch with Xataka. As I say, until Saturday we will not know for sure if the launch will be on Monday, but at Xataka we are already preparing everything to follow it live, report on the progress and analyze the near future of the great space adventure of the moment: return, from again, to the moon.

The NASA Just confirmed that the Artemis I mission has passed its Flight Readiness Review. The FRR is the flight…

The NASA Just confirmed that the Artemis I mission has passed its Flight Readiness Review. The FRR is the flight…

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