Intel prepares to offer its first Wi-Fi 7 chips in 2024 as the Wi-Fi 6E standard tries to take off

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Officially it is called 802.11be, but we will know it by its commercial name, Wi-Fi 7. This new standard for wireless connections is the evolution of Wi-Fi 6 and Wi-Fi 6E (802.11ax), two standards that are only now beginning to make an appearance in computing and mobility.

There are several companies that are already making moves to prepare for this new technology, and one of them it is Intel, which prepares its Wi-Fi 7 chips for 2024. The standard doubles the speeds of Wi-Fi 6E, but at Intel they believe that its performance may be even better by the time it arrives.

Life at 36 Gbps

The novelties of the Wi-Fi 7 standard are important, and Intel wanted to offer a preview of these features. To begin with, not only the 2.4 and 5 GHz bands will be used: the 6 GHz band will also come into action.

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The bandwidth of the transmission channels is also doubled: in the popular Wi-Fi 5 (2013) and Wi-Fi 6/6E (2019) channels of 20, 40, 80 and 160 MHz were used, but with Wi-Fi -Fi 7 too we will have 320 MHz channels. That means more data can be transmitted for each transmission, and is one of the reasons for the next advantage.

Which is neither more nor less than the most striking: transmission speeds. These will benefit greatly, and will be of more than double the current Wi-Fi 6/6E standard.

Thus, from the PC we will connect from the current 2.4 Gbps to the 5.8 Gbps that this technology will offer. The access points will also see their data flows greatly increased, going from 9.6 Gbps of current models to 36 Gbps of Wi-Fi access points 7.

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These speeds are influenced by the new 4K Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) which is a great improvement over the 1024-QAM (1K QAM) of Wi-Fi 6. In the Wi-Fi 5 standard 256-QAM is used, and of course this evolution will guarantee a more stable signal and higher transmission spikes.

The technology Multi Link Operation (MLO) will allow our devices to simultaneously connect to two frequency bands at the same time, thus taking advantage of those that are less saturated at all times to optimize the connection.

All these advantages are remarkable, but at Intel they assure that things could go further. Eric McLaughlin, head of Intel’s wireless division, explained that “with the 802.11be standard more than a year away, there are opportunities for transmission speeds improve even more“.

The situation is certainly curious: we are still getting used to the Wi-Fi 6/6E standard that some manufacturers have not even adopted (Apple, for example, has not), and three years have passed since its launch: it is therefore likely that we are still several years away in considering Wi-Fi 7 as an established standard.

Officially it is called 802.11be, but we will know it by its commercial name, Wi-Fi 7. This new standard for…

Officially it is called 802.11be, but we will know it by its commercial name, Wi-Fi 7. This new standard for…

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