how to follow live the first step for us to return to the Moon

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After the cancellation ‘in extremis’ on the 29th, NASA has everything ready to retry the launch of the first mission of the Artemis program this afternoon. After these days’ analysis, engineers are convinced that Monday’s problem was solely due to a malfunctioning sensor. The near future of our return to the Moon is played today.


What happened on Monday? Nobody invites 25,000 people and hundreds of journalists to cancel a launch at the last minute. And although it is true that NASA was convinced that everything was going to be fine, the SLS rocket has had a bumpy ride over the past year. The agency has carried out four “wet dress rehearsals” to clear up all doubts about the rocket’s fuel load and study all the details that could arise in the launch process. Well, all four trials had problems.

On Monday it seemed that everything was going well, until the third of the four rocket engines began to give problems. Although engineers had been working on refueling all night, the engine failed to reach proper temperature despite attempts to resolve it before the launch window passed. After examining all the data, the engineers believe that the problem was with a sensor and, once solved, everything is ready for this afternoon.

When will the next attempt be? Artemis I will have his second chance today. If all goes according to plan, the launch will take place in Florida at 8:17 p.m. Spanish peninsular time. As usual, everything can be followed from NASA streaming.

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What exactly is Artemis I? The Artemis program is one of the great scientific projects of the moment: not only does it seek to set foot on the Moon again (to take “the first woman and the next man” there), but it also wants to establish a sustainable presence on the surface and in lunar orbit ; and, incidentally, lay the foundations for a lunar economy. Within this ambitious program, Artemis I constitutes the first big step.

We are talking about an unmanned flight, yes; one that has been delayed on successive occasions, true. But, above all, it is the great litmus test for the Space Launch System (SLS) megarocket and the Orion capsule: two central elements of the program. If all goes well, Orion will orbit the Moon before returning to Earth and splashing down somewhere in the Pacific. It’s a small step for the Artemis program, but a big step for our return to the neighboring satellite.

After the cancellation ‘in extremis’ on the 29th, NASA has everything ready to retry the launch of the first mission…

After the cancellation ‘in extremis’ on the 29th, NASA has everything ready to retry the launch of the first mission…

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